Close ×

News

Dennis Ramsay joins FBM as new Health Care Lead

Forecasting the emerging opportunities in health care infrastructure renewal that lay ahead, FBM has added respected architect Dennis Ramsay to their roster as their new Health Care Lead.  

Ramsay comes to FBM with a wealth of expertise in health care infrastructure design. His projects have included the Valley Regional Hospital, St. Martha's Hospital Redevelopment, the new Colchester East Hants Health Centre, the new Hybrid and Interventional Suites at the QEII, and most recently the new NICU and PICU at the IWK Health Centre.

Nationally as Principal, National Sector Leader, Healthcare for Architecture49, Ramsay provided leadership to their healthcare portfolio including the design of national and international projects.

“In Nova Scotia we’re not only facing the pressure to replace aging infrastructure, but there is also a need to expand on existing facilities to incorporate more innovative, inclusive and sustainable features,” says Ramsay. “Locally owned and with a well-established reputation for the delivery of high quality projects, FBM is ideally positioned to renew their legacy of health care architecture in Nova Scotia, which has included the Dartmouth General Hospital, the QEII Dickson Building, and the South Shore Regional Hospital.”

A graduate of Dalhousie University, Ramsay has built an extensive portfolio not only in health care, but also in educational, institutional and residential facilities. He has been a long-time supporter of the Nova Scotia Association of Architects, serving as Vice President for two terms as well as Chair of the Procurement Committee for over two decades.

“Dennis has been involved in the master planning and execution of some of the most complex health care facilities on the local, national and international landscape,” says George Cotaras, President of FBM.  “Quite simply, with Dennis’ passion and expertise, FBM is now in a far stronger position to take on a significant role in the provision of health care architecture within Atlantic Canada.”